More scalable slaves



Nio

NIO-based Java Web Start (JNLP) slave handling is coming to 1.560. This will help you run a large number of JNLP slaves more efficiently. A connected JNLP slave used to occupy one thread on the master, but now it occupies none. Combined with the earlier change that eliminated threads from idle executors, now you can connect thousands of slaves.

All you have to do is to use the latest slave.jar from Jenkins 1.560. No other changes are necessary on users' part.

A bulk of this is implemented in remoting 2.38, and a good part of it was implemented about a year ago on the airplane on the way to Europe.

Maven job type performance improvements in Maven plugin 2.2


I recently had an opportunity to visit a big Jenkins user on site, and one of the things they've told me is that building projects in the Maven job type is substantially slower than doing the same with the freestyle project type.

This is partly expected, because this job type does more for you. For example, it automatically archives your build artifacts, fingerprints all the relevant information, and so on. These are good things, and naturally, it cost time.

But the slow down they are seeing was substantial, and this is a complaint I've heard from others as well. So I started looking into it.

With a help of artificial delay induced to my network interface and several custom scripts to probe into the running processes, I was able to understand what was going on and make some good improvements.

Your Java Web Start slaves will be always clean



If you have slaves that connect through Java Web Start (such as slaves installed as Windows services), we have a good news for you.

In case of a connection loss, this type of slaves has been designed to automatically attempt to reconnect to the master. This makes sense because you want these slaves to remain online all the time, even if your janitor trips over the ethernet cable. Unfortunately, it also means that over the time, these slaves accumulate gunk, such as mutated static states, any left-over threads or memory leaks, or native libraries that are loaded into JVM.

Call for Sponsors: 2014 Jenkins User Conferences

Jenkins User Conference (JUC) season is upon us! It’s a busy year for the Butler – he’s hosting conferences all over and looking for sponsors to help:

  • Boston – June 18
  • Berlin – June 25
  • Herzelia, Israel – July 16
  • Bay Area (California) – October (date TBD)

Mr. Jenkins and the JUC Organizing Committee want to invite you and your company to sponsor a JUC this year. Show your support for the Jenkins community and help keep costs low for attendees*. The funds go to are put to good use: conferences are two full tracks. Lunch, light breakfast, coffee and a coveted Jenkins t-shirt are also included.

Jenkins User Conferences This Year

Over the past three years, the Jenkins User Conference is held annually in the Bay Area with a few events in different locations around the world. The Jenkins User Conference has established a reputation as a focal point for the Jenkins community to come together to share new ideas and best practices. Each year we have experienced the growth and expansion within the Jenkins community. This year we are taking this platform to other regions of the world, offering regional gatherings of Jenkins users and developers.

At the moment, we are working on the following JUCs and events for 2014:

  • JUC Boston - June 18
  • JUC Berlin - June 25
  • JUC Israel - July 16
  • JUC San Francisco Bay Area - October (TBD)
  • JUC Australia/New Zealand - November/Dec (TBD)

Jenkins Events

  • Copenhagen - September
  • Brazil - November/December (TBD)

There are a few different ways to get involved: