Planet

POTD: random but meaningful name generator

kohsuke's blog - Sun, 2014-04-06 23:12

I’m working on the automated blackbox acceptance tests for Jenkins, where I often need to generate random unique names. The code has been using random number generator to generate such names, but as I was debugging test failures, it became painful to remember those random names.

For example, a test might create two new jenkins jobs “random_name_155230″ and “random_name_137204″. Now which one was supposed to be the upstream and which one is downstream? Aside from a few exceptions, humans are generally not good at remembering those random numbers.

So I thought it’d be a lot better if these names are more meaningful, like “constructive_carrot” or “flexible_designer”. That is, if I have a decent sized corpus of N English adjectives and M nouns, I can generate NxM unique names (and induce a few chuckles to whoever see the generated names.)

After a bit of googling, I came across wordnet, and I took a subset of its corpus to come up with a small library that generates human-friendly random names. It has about 600 adjectives and 2400 nouns, resulting in 1.5 million unique names before the generator wraps around.

You’d use this library like this:

RandomNameGenerator rnd = new RandomNameGenerator(0); while (true) System.out.println(rnd.next());

The code is under the BSD license with no advertisement clause, and the library is on Maven Central. Hope you find it useful.

Categories: Planet

POTD: Application configuration via Guice binding + Groovy

kohsuke's blog - Sat, 2014-03-01 14:12

Often I write my applications with Guice. I also often want to make those applications configurable externally. For example I might inject username and password for that app to talk to another app, I might configure some timeout value, and so on. I make these configuration values available in Guice, so that I can access them wherever I need them. All of this is pretty common in many other places, I’d imagine.

Given that all I’m doing here is to pass configuration values from left to right, I thought it’d be nice if I can write configuration directly as a Guice module by using Guice binder EDSL. Then I won’t have to parse and translate these configuration any more.

And that became my project of the day.

This little library allows you to write Guice binding definitions in a text file:

timeout = 3 bind Payment named "customer" to VisaPayment

From your program, you use GroovyWiringModule to load this configuration file:

Module config = new GroovyWiringModule(new File("/etc/myapp.conf")); Injector i = Guice.createInjector( Modules.override( ... my application's modules ...) .with(config))

The end result is that the above script gets translated into the following binding:

bind(int.class).annotatedWith(Names.named("timeout")).toInstance(3) bind(Payment.class).annotatedWith(Names.named("customer")).to(VisaPayment.class)

Using Groovy as the host language for DSL has other benefits. If you are using system properties or environment variables to configure something, you are basically stuck with strings as the only representation of the configuration. With Groovy, I can create a relatively complex object and bind them, or even put some logic to further obtain values from elsewhere:

bind Payment toInstance new VisaPayment( cardNumber: "1234-5678-9012-3456", expiration: new Date(System.currentTimeInMillis()+TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(30), cvv: new URL("http://secret.server/cvv").text)

With the functionality in Guice to override definitions in one module by another, I can also even override bindings defined in programs, for example to get more logging, add a filter, etc.

Categories: Planet

POTD: cucumber annotation indexer

kohsuke's blog - Thu, 2014-02-27 22:41

Cucumber for Java requires that you specify the packages in which your step definitions exist. At runtime, cucumber uses some hack to try to list all the classes in this package (it’s a hack because class loaders never really support the listing operation), loads them one by one, and finds those that have step definition annotations like @When and @Then. This is both poor user experience (can’t you just find my step definitions!?) and poor performance (loading all the classes under a package is expensive.)

So I wrote a library that offers a much better alternative. It uses annotation indexer to create an index of step definitions and hooks at compile time. Thanks to JSR-269, this happens automatically on Java 6 and later. With the index in /META-INF/annotations, runtime can load all the step definitions quite efficiently.

The library contains a Backend implementation, so you should be able to just add it to your project dependency, and cucumber should automatically find this (and thus all your step definitions and hooks.)

By the way, this horrible technique of scanning jar files, listing class files, and finding annotations from there is unfortunately commonly seen in many other libraries. This was a necessary evil in the days of Java 5, but it should really die in this day and age. If you realy on the classpath scanning, please switch to annotation indexer, which provides the backbone functionality of this POTD.

Categories: Planet