Jenkins Celebration Day is February 26

Congratulations! The Jenkins project officially went over the 100K active users mark sometime in January. As of January 31, we were at 102,992. YOU are one of the 100K active users!

As discussed on a couple recent project meetings, we have designated February 26 as Jenkins Celebration Day.

To make some noise, here is what we are doing starting NOW:

  • Write a blog about anything related to Jenkins. Post your blog and Tweet out a link to it. Include the hashtag #Jenkins100K in your post.
  • On February 26, we will hold a raffle and pick four names at random. The grand prize winner will get a 3D Jenkins Butler model. Five others will get their pick of Jenkins swag (up to $20) from the Jenkins online store.

OTHER WAYS TO CELEBRATE

There are a number of other things planned and we want YOU to be involved. This blog post is the central place to come for all things related to the celebration.

2015 Jenkins User Conferences - Call for Papers

The Jenkins User Conference 2015 is seeking submissions that reflect the latest innovations in Jenkins usage.

Office Hours tomorrow: workflow security model & plugin compatibility

In tomorrow's Jenkins office hours, Jesse Glick will talk about two topics in the workflow plugin that he has been asked about:

  • Security model: script security, permissions
  • Plugin compatibility: SimpleBuildStep and friends, custom steps, etc.

The session should be interesting to anyone using workflow or thinking about using workflow. Jesse is one of the top contributors in the community, so it'd be definitely worth your time!

#BreakingBuilds

A lot of us has grown fond of our loyal butler Mr.Jenkins over time, which was created by Frontside and chosen as a result of a logo contest. In the true open-source style, the logo has since evolved into many different derivative works, such as a plugin, a 3D model, and a bobble head.

Our friends at CloudBees are running a #BreakingBuilds social media contest through Jan 5th to have some fun with Mr.Jenkins.

Workflow plugin is 1.0

Jenkins started with a notion of jobs and builds at heart. One script is one job, and as you repeatedly execute jobs, it creates builds as records. As the use case of Jenkins gets more sophisticated, people started combining jobs to orchestrate ever more complex activities.

A number of plugins have been developed to enable all sorts of different ways to compose jobs, and many are used quite successfully in production. But this resulted in a certain degree of complexity for users to figure out how to assemble these plugins.

So we felt the need to develop a single unified solution that subsumes all these different ways to orchestrate activities that may span across multiple build slaves, code repositories, etc. Various inputs from users as well as other plugin developers played a key role.

The result of this is the workflow plugin, which is what a number of us, including Jesse Glick an myself, are focused on in the past few months.

The plugin approaches the problem by defining a DSL for you to describe an execution of a job. Various convenient primitives are available, such as executing shell scripts, checking out the source code, obtaining an executor or a build workspace, etc.