Extreme Feedback Lamp, Switch Gear style

This is a guest post by Aske Olsson

Extreme feedback is an incredibly powerful way to drive quality and accelerate your developer fast feedback loop.

Having eXtreme Feedback Devices (XFDs) hooked up to your Jenkins jobs gives everyone on your team instant insight into the current software state. At customer after customer we've seen extreme feedback devices drive significant incremental productivity gains, so about a year ago we started talking about taking the concept mainstream and making it easily available to any development team. So, as a small side-project, we've decided to scratch our own itch and developed an easy-to-deploy, Linux-based, laser-cut, extreme feedback device, specifically designed for Jenkins. It infers a feeling of urgency when the build is broken, and a better sense of a achievement once the problem is fixed. Just connect the XFD to your network, install the "extreme feedback plugin" on your Jenkins server and configure which jobs to feedback extremely.

2 version control plugins in beta testing before a major release

Git plugin and TFS plugin are calling for interested parties to try out their 2.0 beta binaries before they get released.

Git plugin 2.0 contains a major refactoring and UI simplifications, and TFS plugin contains a rewritten polling logic that does not require a workspace.

If you think you'd benefit from these changes, please head to their respective beta testing page and try out the new bits, while we can still change them.

Jenkins User Conference Palo Alto 2013

Jenkins User Conference is back to California again!

Just like the last two years, this full day event packs talks from Jenkins developers and users, and it would be a great opportunity for Jenkins users to get to know each other and share their experiences.

The agenda is already posted, covering everything from robotics to mobile developments, effective management of Jenkins instances to branching techniques. I'm personally looking forward to a number of talks from serious large-scale users, and JUC Israel was of any indication, it'd be a great opportunity to get feedback from people.

This year, we are moving the event to a weekday (Oct 23rd) to see if it helps or hurts the attendance. Similarly, the event is now in Palo Alto, as opposed to San Francisco. The site also happens to be a former Sun Microsystems headquarter, a place of some nostalgic value to me.

Jenkins User Event in Copenhagen on September 6

Seize the opportunity to join the Jenkins community!

Just like last year, the Scandinavian Jenkins Conference will be in Copenhagen, Denmark, hosted by Praqma and sponsored by CloudBees, Sony, Switch::Gears, and PRQA. The open source community will gather on September 6th for a full day of networking and knowledge sharing at The Department of Computer Science at The University of Copenhagen.

Conference Site

Based on last year's success, Jenkins developers, architects, business managers, etc. from all over the world will gather to exchange experiences and promote the open source platform. As a special feature the conference will include an opening keynote from Jenkins founder Kohsuke Kawaguchi as well as other industry pioneers, who will take the podium to present findings within the latest technology, best practice, hand-on experiences, etc.

To get updates on the conference follow the JCI13Blog where you can view the latest news on venue and speakers.

Register Now!

Faster slave classloading


Jenkins comes with the remoting library that it uses to communicate between a master and slaves. This is a pretty awesome library, I think, which served us well.

One of the things this remoting layer does it to transfer the Java byte code on demand from the master to slaves on demand. This approach helps us keep slave deployment simple, as you don't have to keep the master and all the slaves in sync, but it also made the slave start-up slower, because none of the byte code loaded to slaves are kept around. It was all forgotten once the slave gets disconnected.

When slaves are static and stays online for hours, this wasn't a problem at all. But as more and more slaves become elastic (think EC2 or CloudBees DEV@cloud), This delay is becoming more and more noticeable. A similar issue happens when the Maven project type, which uses the same remoting library to talk to the running Maven build.