New Wiki URL Requirement for Plugins

Let's say you're browsing the 'Available' tab in the Jenkins plugin manager for interesting-looking plugins. How do you learn more about them, preferably without installing them on your production instance? You click the plugin's name, which usually links to the plugin's wiki page, of course!

Unfortunately, it's possible for plugins to be published without a wiki page, or any other documentation aside from what's provided in the plugin itself. This is really unfortunate, as users rely on wiki pages and similar documentation to learn more about a plugin before installing or upgrading it, like its features, limitations, or recent changes. Additionally, plugin wiki pages have a special section at the top that provides an automatically generated technical overview of the plugin, such as dependencies to other plugins, the minimum compatible Jenkins version, a list of developers, and links to the source code repository and issue tracker component. Everyone learning about or using a plugin benefits from a plugin wiki page and luckily, almost all plugins have one!

To ensure that every plugin has at least a basic wiki page with some documentation, we decided to only publish plugins in the Jenkins update center that have and link to a wiki page.

JUC Speaker Blog Series: Martin Hobson, JUC U.S. East

I’ve been using Jenkins for some time now as the build server for the various projects that are assigned to our four-person software development team, but recently I had exposure to how things were done in a much larger team, and I came away with a better understanding of the kinds of demands that are placed on a build pipeline in these environments. It was quite an education – while the CI pipelines that I administer in our small team might require a handful of virtual machines in our corporate cloud, the pipeline in this team supported over one hundred developers and required several hundred VM instances at any given time.

JUC Speaker Blog Series: Stephan Hochdörfer, JUC Europe

I am very much looking forward to the Jenkins User Conference in London where I will present our insights on how to use Jenkins in a PHP related environment. Moving to Jenkins about 5 years ago bitExpert gained a lot of experience in running and managing a distributed Jenkins infrastructure. bitExpert builds custom applications for our clients which means that we have to deal with different project infrastructures, e.g. different PHP versions. We heavily rely on the build nodes concept of Jenkins which I will briefly outline in the session. Besides that I will give some in-depth insights on how we use Jenkins on a daily basis for the "traditional" CI related tasks (e.g. linting code, checking code style, running tests) as well as how Jenkins is used to power our integration tests. Last but not least I will cover how Jenkins acts as a kind of backbone for our Satis server which allows us to host the metadata of our company's private Composer packages. Throughout the talk I will point out which Jenkins plugins we use in the different contexts to give you a good starting point if you are new in the Jenkins ecosystem.

JUC Speaker Blog Series: Damien Coraboeuf, JUC Europe

Scaling and maintenance of thousands of Jenkins jobs

How to avoid creating of a jungle of jobs when dealing with thousands of them?

In our organisation, we have one framework, which is used to develop products. Those products are themselves used to develop end user projects. Maintenance and support are needed at each level of delivery and we use branches for this. This creates hundreds of combinations.

Now, for each product or project version (or branch), we have a delivery pipeline. We start by compiling, testing, packaging, publishing. Then we deploy the application on the different supported platforms and go through different levels of validation, until we’re ready for delivery. Aside from a few details and configuration elements, most of the pipelines are identical from one branch to the other, from one project to the other.

So, one framework, some products, several projects, maintenance branches, complex pipelines… We end up having many many jobs to create, duplicate and maintain. Before even going into this direction, we saw this as a blocking issue - there was no way we could maintain manually thousands of jobs on a day to day basis.

JUC Speaker Blog Series: Will Soula, JUC U.S. East

Chat Ops and Jenkins

I am very excited to be attending the Jenkins User Conference on the East Coast this year. This will be my third presentation at a JUC and fourth time to attend, but my first on the East Coast. I have learned about a lot of cool stuff in the past, which is why I started presenting, to tell people about the cool stuff we are doing at Drilling Info. One of the cooler things we have implemented in the last year is Chat Ops and our bot Sparky. It started as something neat to play with ("Oooo lots of kittens") but quickly turned into something more serious.