#BreakingBuilds

A lot of us has grown fond of our loyal butler Mr.Jenkins over time, which was created by Frontside and chosen as a result of a logo contest. In the true open-source style, the logo has since evolved into many different derivative works, such as a plugin, a 3D model, and a bobble head.

Our friends at CloudBees are running a #BreakingBuilds social media contest through Jan 5th to have some fun with Mr.Jenkins.

Workflow plugin is 1.0

Jenkins started with a notion of jobs and builds at heart. One script is one job, and as you repeatedly execute jobs, it creates builds as records. As the use case of Jenkins gets more sophisticated, people started combining jobs to orchestrate ever more complex activities.

A number of plugins have been developed to enable all sorts of different ways to compose jobs, and many are used quite successfully in production. But this resulted in a certain degree of complexity for users to figure out how to assemble these plugins.

So we felt the need to develop a single unified solution that subsumes all these different ways to orchestrate activities that may span across multiple build slaves, code repositories, etc. Various inputs from users as well as other plugin developers played a key role.

The result of this is the workflow plugin, which is what a number of us, including Jesse Glick an myself, are focused on in the past few months.

The plugin approaches the problem by defining a DSL for you to describe an execution of a job. Various convenient primitives are available, such as executing shell scripts, checking out the source code, obtaining an executor or a build workspace, etc.

Mobile App for Jenkins User Conference Bay Area

Jenkins User Conference in Bay Area is this Thursday, and one of the new things this year is the mobile app.

There's an Android version as well as an iPhone version. I've installed it locally, and it's very handy for checking the agenda, get more info about speakers and sponsors.

FreeBSD project use of Jenkins for OS testing

This is a guest post by Craig Rodrigues


The FreeBSD project produces a modern operating system derived from BSD Unix.

In the past 6 months, we have set up Jenkins at http://jenkins.freebsd.org/, to continuously build FreeBSD as developers add new code to the project. This has helped us identify and fix build breaks very quickly.

We have gone even farther by integrating Jenkins, Kyua, and Bhyve. Kyua is a testing framework for infrastructure software. Bhyve is the native hypervisor that comes with FreeBSD (similar to KVM on Linux).

We use the Build Flow plugin in this example Build flow to do the following:

  1. Build the FreeBSD kernel and userland on amd64 whenever someone checks in new code to http://svn.freebsd.org
  2. Create a bootable FreeBSD disk image with makefs
  3. Boot the image under bhyve

CVE-2014-3566 "poodle" impact on Jenkins

Another day, another SSL vulnerability! Google has announced a vulnerability in SSL v3, and if you are using the "Winstone" servlet container built into Jenkins, and if you are using the HTTPS connector with the --httpsPort option (it is off by default), then you are vulnerable to this problem.

I've just issued a security advisory on this. If you haven't already subscribed to the Jenkins security advisory mailing list, this is a great opportunity to do so.

The advisory includes the target delivery vehicles for the fix and how you can address the problem in the mean time. Inside corporate intranet, where Jenkins is typically used, I suppose there's a degree of trust among participants to make this less of a problem.