Plugins

Workflow plugin code walk-through

Jesse and I will walk through the source code of the workflow plugin, highlights key abstractions and extension points, and discuss how they are put together.

If you are interested in developing or retrofitting plugins to work with workflows, I think you'll find this session interesting.

The event will be on Google Hangout tomorrow. The time of the day is the same as usual office hours.

Workflow plugin tutorial: writing a Step impl

The other day I was explaining how to implement a new workflow primitive to Vivek Pandey, and I captured it as a recording.

The recording goes over how to implement the Step extension point, which is the workflow equivalent of BuildStep extension point. If you are interested in jumping on the workflow plugin hacking, this might be useful (and don't forget to get in touch with us so that we can help you!)

Jenkins Office Hours: dotCi

Surya walked us through the dotCI source code yesterday, and a bunch of ideas about how to reuse pieces are discussed. The recording is on YouTube, and my notes are here.

Jenkins Office Hours: dotCi

Tomorrow in Jenkins office hours, Surya Gaddipati will be going over DotCi, a package of features that integrates Jenkins closely with GitHub, configuration via .ci.yml file in source tree, built-in Docker support and MongoDB backend.

I think there's a number of interesting pieces here that could be split into individual plugins for reuse, and possible alignment with existing efforts like Script Security plugin or Literate plugin.

To record the show, this event will be in a different hangout from the usual one, but the time is the same. Looking forward to seeing you!

Adopt a plugin

Today on IRC, I was asked how someone new to the project can get started working on Jenkins, when s/he has no particular preference or pet-peeve.

This is a good question for which the project should have a canned answer ready, so here is one approach — adopt a plugin!

Often, a Jenkins plugin gets developed by someone to scratch his own itch. That person shares the plugin with the community, and since it does everything he needs, he moves on to work on something else. Then another person starts using that plugin, comes up with an idea for improvement, implements that, and then moves on. Given that we have more than 900 plugins today, there are a plenty of plugins that are currently co-maintained by the community, which could really use a focused loving caregiver.